A description of the republic where plato presents many interesting ideas of socrates

Justice is Better than Injustice.

A description of the republic where plato presents many interesting ideas of socrates

The Privilege of Power At this point in the dialogue, Plato introduces Thrasymachus the sophist, another fictionalized portrait of an historical personality. After impatiently dismissing what has gone before, Thrasymachus recommends that we regard justice as the advantage of the stronger; those in positions of power simply use their might to decree what shall be right.

This, too, expresses a fairly common if somewhat pessimistic view of the facts about social organization.

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But of course Socrates has other ideas. For one thing, if the ruling party mistakenly legislates to its own disadvantage, justice will require the rest of us to perform the apparently contradictory feat of both doing what they decree and also doing what is best for them.

More significantly, Socrates argues that the best ruler must always be someone who knows how to rule, someone who understands ruling as a craft. But since crafts of any sort invariably aim to produce some external goal Gk.

Thus, good rulers, like good shepherds, must try to do what is best for those who have been entrusted to them, rather than seeking their own welfare.

Surely anyone would prefer to profit by committing an act of injustice against another than to suffer as the victim of an act of injustice committed by someone else. Some preliminary answers come immediately to mind: But if Socrates himself might have been satisfied with responses of this sort, Plato the philosophical writer was not.

There must be an answer that derives more fundamentally from the nature of reality. Is Justice Better than Injustice? When Thrasymachus falls silent, other characters from the dialogue continue to pursue the central questions: Not everyone will agree that justice should be defended as worthwhile for its own sakerather than for the extrinsic advantages that may result from its practice.

It helps to have a concrete example in mind. So Glaucon recounts the story of Gyges, the shepherd who discovered a ring that rendered him invisible and immediately embarked on a life of crime with perfect impunity. Adeimantus narrows the discussion even further by pointing out that the personal benefits of having a good reputation are often acquired by anyone who merely appears to act justly, whether or not that person really does so.

Republic a This suggests the possibility of achieving the greatest possible advantage by having it both ways: In order to demonstrate once and for all that justice really is valuable for its own sake alone, Plato must show that a life of the second sort is superior to a life of the first sort.

Thrasymachus, Glaucon, and Adeimantus have given voice to a fundamental issue at the heart of any effort to improve human conduct by appealing to the principles of moral philosophy.

If what I am morally required to do can in some circumstances be different from what I would choose do for my own benefit, then why should I be moral?

Plato wrote the remainder of The Republic in an attempt to provide an adequate, satisfying answer to this question.

After Book I, the entire dialogue is pervaded by an extended analogy between the justice of individual human beings and the that of an entire society or city-state.

Since the crucial elements of justice may be easier to observe on the larger scale.Plato's discussions of rhetoric and poetry are both extensive and influential.

A description of the republic where plato presents many interesting ideas of socrates

As in so many other cases, he sets the agenda for the subsequent tradition. Because it covers so many issues, The Republic can be read in several different ways: But of course Socrates has other ideas. For one thing, if the ruling party mistakenly legislates to its own disadvantage, justice will require the rest of us to perform the (apparently) contradictory feat of both doing what they decree and also doing what.

The Republic study guide contains a biography of Plato, literature essays, a complete e-text, quiz questions, major themes, characters, and a full summary and analysis. The Politics of Plunder in Plato's Republic. 0 Views.

A description of the republic where plato presents many interesting ideas of socrates

Socrates can be seen as playing with Glaucon just as he does with many others in order to expose their ideas. Socrates knows Glaucon will accept a polis based on plunder and full of extreme ideas, because the residents of this hypothetical polis would suffer no injustice, which would be.

The Republic by Plato research paper seeks to answer the question of justice as a springboard to a larger concept: Plato’s ideas about politics, life and the soul.

Plato's Ethics and Politics in The Republic (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy)

Justice is an individual trait that gives us internal balance and allows us to lead a good life. Plato's book, The Republic, deals with practical issues such as the nature of justice, the human condition, and the basis of societal order and political power. It is a treasure trove of ideas and has long been a central work in Western literature.

SparkNotes: The Republic: Book I